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Best Exercises for Strong Bones

By Elizabeth Quinn // September 2016


Build Stronger Bones with the Right Moves

Couple running up stairs

There are plenty of good reasons to lift weights as part of a regular workout routine. Increasing muscle mass and tone makes nearly every physical activity easier to do, it helps avoid unwanted fat gain, it improves athletic performance and it can dramatically improve self-confidence and self-esteem. But one of the best reasons for women to add more weight-bearing exercise to their workouts is to build stronger bones, which may prevent the onset of osteoporosis in older age.

Any time you strengthen your muscles, you strengthen the bones, but some exercises are more effective at the job. Weight-bearing exercises, such as running, jumping, hopping and lifting weights, are the most effective type of exercise for strengthening the bones.

It’s never too late to increase bone density by adding strength training exercises. Studies show that even people in their 60’s and beyond, can significantly increase the density of their bones when they perform regular weight lifting exercises.

So just what are the best exercises for building bone density?

Barbell squat exercise

Lift Weights for a Greater Bone Density

One of the best ways to build stronger bones is to do regular weight lifting exercises such as  squats, lunges and other full-body weight training exercises. This sort of exercise has been shown to help build bone density quickly in people of all ages. The goal of strength training is to safely lift a heavy enough weight so that you are taxing the muscles, but not so much that you have poor form or sloppy technique. Ideally, lift as much weight as you can safely control for 6-10 repetitions, rest and repeat a total of three times.

If you are new to weight lifting, get guidance from a coach or trainer to avoid unsafe lifting technique and reduce your risk of injury. Start with lighter weights that you can easily control, and over time, build up to heavier weights.

There are many different exercises you can add to a routine designed to improve bone strength, but five of the best include:

  1. Squats
  2. Deadlifts
  3. Weighted Walking Lunges
  4. Push Ups
  5. Dumbbell Rows

Jumping builds bone density

Jump Your Way to Stronger Bones

Any exercise that involves hops, jumps and bounding movements can also increase bone density. This type of high-intensity impact exercise creates a significant force on the muscle, joints and bones, which is actually good for bone building, but it can also lead to injuries if you haven’t been engaging in high-impact exercise, so caution is advised for those just getting started.

Need a jump rope? Buy from Amazon.

If you aren’t convinced that jumping can build bones, in 2015, researchers showedthat middle-aged women who did a series of hopping exercises twice a day for four months significantly increased the bone density in their hips. This is great news because hip fractures in older women can be debilitating.

The best jumping exercises for better bones include:

  1. Rope Jumping
  2. Jump Training
  3. Plyometrics

Running for better bones

Moderate-impact Activities Strengthen Bones

Moderate-impact exercises such as running, hiking, stair climbing, and yoga are other good ways to give your bones a workout.  While moderate impact exercise doesn’t give you the same bang for the buck as the more forceful exercises (weight lifting and jumping), they do put enough stress on the muscles and bones to improve the density of the bones particularly in the lower body, hips and lower spine.

And although it’s not considered an exercise specifically for building bones, balance training is also recommended for anyone who wants to improve muscle strength, coordination and stability which can go a long way to decrease the likelihood of falls or fractures, particularly in older adults when bones are often slower to heal.

The best moderate-impact exercises for building bone density include:

  1. Running or Jogging
  2. Stair climbing
  3. Yoga or Pilates
  4. Hiking
  5. Rowing
  6. Balance Training

 

How to hit the grocery store with health in mind

Healthy food doesn’t just magically show up at your house. You’ve got to shop for it, and with the overwhelming number of choices available in today’s grocery stores, this can be challenging. Here are seven tips on how to fill your cart with the good stuff.

1. Shop the Perimeter

If you’ve heard one grocery store rule, it’s probably this: shop the perimeter. The reasoning behind this trick is that the middle aisles house the junk. The perimeter of the grocery store is where you are more likely to encounter whole, real foods like produce, lean protein and healthy dairy options.

But don’t give up on all aisle-based options. Low sodium canned beans, seasonings to spice up your meals, and healthy grains and cereals can all be found in the central aisles. Just make sure to read all packaged food labels so you know what you’re putting into your body; and generally, linger longer in the perimeter of the store.

2. Don’t Bulk up on Bulk

Bulk foods are great if you really need to buy in bulk. But most people are buying for an average of two to four people. Buying in bulk can give you a false sense of frugality. If you bring too much of one food into your home, chances are you’ll end up tossing some of it. Shy away from bulk foods unless you’re certain they’re your best bet.

3. Avoid the Endcaps

Avoid the Endcaps

Food companies pay premium prices to catch your eye. You know those captivating displays at the end of each aisle? They’re called endcaps. And when was the last time an endcap featured a truly healthy food you absolutely had to have?

Endcaps tend to display new packaged and processed items that are light on nutrients and heavy on added fats and sugars. The story may be different if you’re at an exclusive health foods store, but endcaps are best left alone at your typical grocery store.

4. Do Not Leave Home Without a List

If you’re the meal planner in your household, you know the importance of a making a grocery store list. Showing up at the store and winging it can cause you to purchase items you don’t need. A grocery list can be your best friend when you’re shopping for healthy foods. Stick to the list like it’s your job to help you avoid items that don’t deserve a space in your cart.

5. If You Can’t Pronounce It, Don’t Buy It

It’s inevitable that you’ll have to buy some sort of packaged foods if you want to achieve balance and variety in your weekly meal plan. But one way to avoid the worst of the worst of grocery store offerings is to carefully scrutinize ingredient lists.

Ingredients are listed on food labels in order by weight. The higher up on the ingredient list an item is the greater percentage it constitutes. If a food is packed up top with a litany of ingredients you can’t pronounce, chances are it shouldn’t be going into your mouth. This may seem time consuming at first, but as you identify foods with clean ingredient lists, you’ll add them to your regular routine and bypass the garbage with grace.

6. Carefully Consider Organics

Carefully Consider Organics

In a perfect world we would all eat organic. But organic isn’t an option for everyone, or for every type of food. Some organic foods are prohibitively expensive, while others may have been shipped from halfway around the world. Many organic foods are just highly processed, seemingly more healthful iterations of traditional junk food. Remember—an organic cookie is still a cookie.

Although organic produce has been grown without genetic modification, fertilizers, chemical pesticides, herbicides or irradiation, organic fruits and vegetables may not be significantly more nutritious than their conventionally grown counterparts. The amount of vitamin C in an organic strawberry is relatively similar to that of a non-organic one. You can do your part for the environment by purchasing organic, but don’t ditch conventional produce if you can’t afford or access organics.

7. Know That “Natural” Means Nothing

Food manufacturers love to prey the general population’s misunderstanding of the word “natural.” While this word conjures up images of health and virtue, the term “natural” on a food label actually means nothing. There is no widely accepted standard for use of this word. You can have the most highly processed, not nutritious, glorified candy bar and it can bear the label, “natural.” Keep in mind that if you’re reading the word “natural” on a label, that label is on a package, and that packaged food is just that—packaged and not all that natural.

Group Classes vs. Personal Training: Which Is Best?

Personal Training May Give You More Bang for Your Buck

By Alycea Ungaro, PT, MS
Updated July 25, 2016

USA, New Jersey, Jersey City, Portrait of senior woman exercising with dumbbells in gym

USA, New Jersey, Jersey City, Portrait of senior woman exercising with dumbbells in gym

Let me whisper in your ear. If you’ve ever felt that groaning feeling when a friend grabs you by the arm to drag you to her spin class or found yourself staring at the exit sign in a hot yoga studio, you may be cut out for an entirely different kind of training.

Despite the popularity of group fitness, one-on-one personal training provides superior results and techniques for the large majority of exercisers.

Let’s compare the differences and why you may want to opt for individual training over group classes.
Supervision and Safety

A fitness instructor’s role is not just to deliver fun workouts. An instructor’s primary role is to keep students safe, in good form and proper alignment regardless of the exercise method.

In any group class, an instructors’ attention is necessarily divided among the number of participants. This subjects students to reduced supervision, minimal safety and questionable form and alignment.
By contrast, a personal training session ensures that you have one hundred percent of your teacher’s attention. As a result, it will be safer and better controlled for proper anatomical form and alignment.

Is it worth it? Group classes come in at a fraction of the cost. However, the amount of injuries that happen in group class workouts is staggering. Beyond the obvious cost of an injury, the setback to your fitness goals is considerable.

Consider the cost of rehabbing from a torn muscle, a dislocation or a herniated disc. The downtime, loss in productivity and cost of health care alone should be enough to convince you that it’s worth it to pony up for one-on-one training.
Motivation and Goals

Group workouts are defined by mantras, music and enthusiastic cheerleading.

All in all, it’s a terrific formula to keep you coming back for more. Unfortunately, just showing up isn’t always enough.

The substance and content of the workout will determine your actual results regardless of strobe lights and entertainment value.

In personal training, you are motivated through each and every move by a trainer who is intimately familiar with your weaknesses, strengths and needs. Results both small and big are tracked and acknowledged consistently, providing the powerful motivator of positive reinforcement. regardless of strobe lights and entertainment value.

Is it worth it? Weekend warriors burn out fast. Motivation is the most elusive long-term element for any exerciser. Unless conditions are just right and results are regularly achieved, your motivation will drop off over and over again.

Realistic goal setting is key to establishing and maintaining proper results. Workouts which over promise movie star results in minimal time are doing a great job selling but they usually can’t deliver.

If you expect dramatic results and don’t get them immediately, you’ll find yourself shopping for a new workout.

Working with a dedicated coach will ensure your motivation remains consistent and your workouts continually progress. A proper kick off is key to sustained motivation. A custom built program that establishes your true starting point is invaluable to your success.
The Story of You: Custom Results

Group workouts are built upon very general fitness principles and one-size-fits-all programming. Boutique gyms formulate their workouts for the “normal healthy” body. There is no comprehensive assessment of your ability or limitations when you walk into a group class.

Regardless of the modifications offered in group training, without an actual intake process such as an interview and assessment, the exercises can not be sufficiently adjusted to your custom needs. Private training does just the opposite.

Beginning with a proper evaluation, your workouts are built specifically to address your goals. And not just for your body type, but in consideration of your health history and your baseline level of fitness.

Although many of us consider ourselves normal and healthy, there is no real baseline for where workout intensities or structure should begin for a given individual in a group class setting.

Every person who exercises brings their own story. Your family history of disease and medications, your personal history of diet and exercise and your individual metabolism and motivation style all play into your story. Add to that list your own physical body type.

Beyond all these factors is your wish list. What are you looking for from your workouts? Your personal goals are a driving factor in your workouts with your trainer. Within the sphere of personal training, your established goals are a constant point of reference in your sessions and will steer your instructor to customize your plan.

In a group class, you’re pretty much on your own with your goals and wish list.

Is it worth it? Of course, budgets vary and personal training is at the top of the exercise food chain in terms of expense. However, personal training sessions are also at the top of the food chain in terms of results.

When it comes to your body, what price is too high to pay for an exercise program that serves your own personal needs and goals? This is an investment that you may not be able to skip.

 

Personal training exists in many formats, from trainers inside big box gyms to those that visit you at home.

pilates-training-GettyImages-112301488-57967e555f9b58461ff167df

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you have tried it once or twice but weren’t convinced, consider Pilates as a test drive into personal training. The signature resistance training utilized by Pilates trainers coupled with their advanced training in programming and anatomy will ensure you have a personalized workout created specifically according to your capacity and your long term goals.

If the budget constraints are too prohibitive, a Pilates studio is ideal. The group classes typically max out at eight or ten as opposed to the thirty to sixty in a cycling, yoga or even barre class. If you can have a solid ten or fifteen percent of your teachers time and attention as opposed to two to four minutes in an hour, you’ll get far more bang for your buck.

How to Foam Roll Your Calf and Quadriceps Muscles

 man using foam roller for self-massage in gym

miljko/E+/Getty Images

The foam roller has become an essential piece of equipment and excellent massage tool for runners. Using your own body weight and a foam roller, you can perform a self-massage that offers similar benefits as deep-tissue massage such as stretching muscles and tendons, decreasing muscle tension, soothing tight fascia, breaking up trigger points, and increasing blood flow and circulation to soft tissues.

If you don’t have the time or money for regular, professional massages, foam rollers are a convenient, less expensive alternative. They’re especially helpful for long distance runners who are prone to ITB syndrome and tight calves, quads, or hamstrings. I always feel more relaxed and loose after I do a post-run foam rolling session.

If you’re new to foam rolling, I have to warn you – it can be uncomfortable, especially if you have some knots (adhesions or trigger points) along the muscle. Before you get started, review these tips, so you make sure you’re doing it correctly:

Foam Rolling Tips

You should limit your foam rolling to no more than 15 minutes. You’re not going to get rid of every knot in a single session. It’s better to work in short sessions of foam rolling after you exercise several times a week.
Try to roll about 3 to 6 inches at a time, using slow and controlled strokes. Spend about 30-60 seconds on one area and then move on to the next.
Although it’s normal to feel some discomfort and soreness when you’re foam rolling, make sure you don’t roll to the point of unbearable pain. If it’s too painful, just move on to a different section. If you experience bruising, you’re doing it too hard. You may need to start with a softer foam roller (less dense) if you can’t do it without intense pain.
Don’t expect to see results overnight when you first start rolling. But after few days of consistent rolling, you’ll notice that you’re not as tight as before.
Many gyms have foam rollers, so you can use one there and ask a trainer to give you a quick demo. If you’re interested in buying your own foam roller for doing it at home, I highly recommend the Trigger Point Grid Foam Roller – Buy from Amazon.com.
After you’ve finished rolling, make sure you stretch the massaged area right away to take advantage of the increased circulation.

    foam rolling calf muscles

miljko/Getty

How to Foam Roll Your Calf Muscles

Many runners suffer from tight calf muscles. Here’s how to self-massage your calves using a foam roller:1. Start by lying on your back, with your legs extended. Place the foam roller under your calf muscles.

2. Now, engage your core, lift your body, and load your weight onto your arms.

3. Roll in a gradual, slow motion back from your knee joint down to your ankle and continue back and forth like that for a few passes. You may feel more tenderness in certain areas, and you can adjust the amount of tension by using your arms and core to ease pressure off. If you’re brand-new to foam rolling, and you have a lot of knots, you may find that you need very little pressure to feel it working.

4. Be sure to maintain steady breathing as you’re rolling. If you come across a tight spot, pause and linger on the roller. Applying direct pressure like that will help break up the knot. But be careful not to overdo it. You should only hold it in one spot for no more than a minute. You can continue to do a few more short rolls over that section to try to release the knot.

5. Perform calf stretches after you finish.

 

How to Roll Your Quadriceps Muscles

Your quadriceps (front thigh muscle) is another area where runners experience tightness. Follow these steps to roll out your quads:

foam rolling quads

DNY59 / Getty

1. Lay down on your front and place the foam roller under your right thigh. Position your left leg splayed out, away from the roller.

2. Using your arms and right foot, roll yourself over the roller, up and down the front of your thigh.

3. Continue to roll the area from your hip flexor down toward your knee. Don’t roll directly over your knee joint.

4. Once you’ve finished your right quad, do the same thing on your left quad.

5. Stretch your quad muscles after you finish.

More Stretching and Flexibility Exercises

If you want more stretching, see how to foam roll your IT band, and these essential stretches for runners. You can also help your hips with these yoga moves for runners with tight hips. But if your problems are hampering you, check when you should see a doctor for a running injury.

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3 Trendy Foods That Live Up to the Hype

3 Trendy Foods That Live Up to the Hype | The Nutrition Twins | Expert Articles | 7/25/2016

21 Easy Foods to Swap

When it comes to weight management, lowering blood pressure and cholesterol, and decreasing inflammation, making small, incremental dietary changes is the way to go. Trying to make too many changes all at once can be a recipe for disaster—this can cause you to feel overwhelmed and make you want to give up. Instead, try modifying each snack and meal by swapping out one or more ingredients.

BREAKFAST

Breakfast

  1. Instead of a bacon, sausage, and cheese omelet, try a spinach, mushroom, and onion (or your choice of veggies) omelet. You’ll lose the unhealthy saturated fat and sodium and replace it with inflammation-fighting antioxidants and belly-filling fiber.
  2. Instead of a bagel and cream cheese, try a whole grain English muffin with nut butter. Lose the refined carbohydrates and empty calories and fill up on fiber, protein and healthy fats.
  3. Instead of fruit-on-the-bottom yogurt, try plain Greek yogurt and add fresh berries and nuts or seeds. The “fruit” on the bottom is more sugar than fruit. Reduce the sugar content by adding fresh, seasonal fruit and then top with crunchy nuts (walnuts, almonds, etc.) or seeds (chia, ground flax or hemp) for added fiber and healthy fats.
  4. Instead of toasted white bread with butter and jam, try whole grain toast with cottage cheese, cinnamon and banana slices. Replace the empty calories, fat and sugar with fiber, protein and good carbohydrates.

LUNCH

Lunch

  1. Instead of ham and cheese with mayo on white bread, try turkey, avocado and tomato on whole grain bread. Ham, cheese and mayo are full of sodium and unhealthy fats and white bread is just refined, processed carbohydrates. Go for lower sodium turkey for protein, avocado for healthy fats, and tomato and whole grain bread for fiber.
  2. Instead of a hamburger and fries, try a lettuce-wrapped grilled chicken breast sandwich with baked sweet potato. Ditch the high sodium and bad fats for lean protein and a sweet spud.
  3. Instead of egg salad made with mayo, try egg salad made with mustard and mashed avocado. Eggs are a great source of protein, but artery-clogging mayo is no way to go. Mustard adds a lot of tang and avocado is full of heart-healthy monounsaturated fats.
  4. Instead of a Cobb salad (lettuce, turkey, bacon, blue cheese, avocado and egg with creamy dressing), try a grilled vegetable salad topped with grilled wild salmon and a Dijon-balsamic vinaigrette. A Cobb salad is a saturated fat bomb! Lighten up your salad and supercharge your veggies by grilling them and add the all-important protein to keep you fuller for longer. Replace the creamy, high-calorie dressing with a vinaigrette made with extra virgin olive oil (healthy fat), which can help with digestion and absorption of vitamins.

DINNER

Dinner

  1. Instead of a steak and mashed potatoes, try wild Alaskan salmon and roasted garlic mashed cauliflower. The fat and sodium in steak and mashed potatoes makes your arteries shake with fear. Wild Alaskan salmon is filled with inflammation-fighting omega-3 fats and mashed garlic cauliflower is a delicious (and sneaky) way to consume those cancer-fighting veggies.
  2. Instead of spaghetti with meatballs, try spaghetti squash with turkey meatballs and marinara sauce. Spaghetti squash, which tricks you into thinking you’re eating pasta, is all the rage for people trying to cut carbohydrates or go Paleo, and it’s delicious. Top it with turkey for protein and lycopene-rich marinara sauce for long-lasting energy.
  3. Instead of a loaded burrito (chicken, beans, rice, cheese, sour cream and guacamole), try a burrito bowl, which is a bowl layered with brown rice, black beans, grilled chicken, pico de gallo and avocado. Lose the oversized, 200-calorie, refined, processed tortilla and eliminate the high-fat cheese, but keep the flavor with the pico de gallo (chunky salsa) and add creaminess with avocado.
  4. Instead of steak fajitas in flour tortillas, try shrimp fajitas in corn tortillas. Shrimp is a healthier protein choice than steak and corn tortillas have more nutritional value than empty-calorie flour tortillas. Just stick to two tortillas and fill up on the filling.

SNACK

Snack

  1. Instead of hummus and pita, try hummus and sliced veggies. Ditch the processed carbs from the pita and swap them out with fiber- and antioxidant-filled red peppers, carrots, and cucumbers; and pair the veggies with protein and healthy fats, found in hummus.
  2. Instead of cheese and crackers, try string cheese with an apple. String cheese is made from part-skim mozzarella cheese, which is lower in saturated fat than cheddar cheese. Pair it with a high-fiber apple (or fruit of your choice) to get long-lasting energy.
  3. Instead of a granola bar, try a homemade trail mix with raw nuts (almonds, walnuts and pistachios) and dried fruit (apricots and tart cherries). Granola bars (and most energy bars) are often candy bars in disguise, and filled with unwanted sugar. What you need is protein, healthy carbs, and good-for-you fats, which is what you get in nuts as well as high-energy dried fruit. Use about ¼ cup of each for a perfectly portioned snack.

DESSERTS/SWEETS

  1. Instead of traditional ice cream, try making ice cream in your food processor with frozen bananas and top with a few dark chocolate chips. Freeze ripe (peeled) sliced bananas and then pop them into a food processor for a creamy ice cream swap. Add some heart-healthy dark chocolate for a delicious and nutritious dessert.
  2. Instead of a slice of blueberry pie, try cooking fresh or frozen blueberries with cinnamon and topping them with plain Greek yogurt. Get the sweetness from the fruit and cinnamon (no need to add any sugar) and protein from the yogurt and enjoy a creamy, sweet and satisfying treat.
  3. Instead of chocolate pudding, make chocolate chia pudding by mixing ½ cup almond milk with 2 Tbsp. chia seeds and 2 Tbsp. cocoa powder. Stir and let sit in refrigerator for a few hours until thick. The antioxidants found in cocoa powder are good for your heart and the chia seeds give you protein, fiber, and healthy fat, which will keep you full for hours.

DRINKS

Drinks

  1. Instead of a latte, try a café Americano. There’s no need to drink your calories. Just add a splash of milk and a sprinkle of cinnamon and you should be good to go.
  2. Instead of sweetened iced tea, try iced green tea. Green tea contains the thermogenic antioxidant EGCG, but in order to reap its benefits, don’t load it down with inflammation-promoting sugar.
  3. Instead of soda, try mixing plain seltzer water with some tart cherry juice. If you like the crispness of soda but don’t want the sugar or artificial sweeteners found in diet soda, mix club soda with any dark juice (blueberry, pomegranate, tart cherry or cranberry) for a shot of flavor and a dose of antioxidants.
N551281U Rock Girl! Contributor
Tiffani Bachus, R.D.N., and Erin Macdonald, R.D.N., are the co-founders of U Rock Girl!, a website designed to nourish the mind, body and spirit of women of all ages and stages of life. They have just authored the rockin’ breakfast cookbook, No Excuses! 50 Healthy Ways to ROCK Breakfast! available at www.URockGirl.com

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Can You Boost Metabolism at Breakfast?

By Malia Frey – Reviewed by a board-certified physician.
Updated December 03, 2015

Have you heard that eating breakfast can boost metabolism? Are you ready to load up on breakfast foods that help you burn more calories? It might seem logical that eating a meal first thing in the morning gets your metabolism revved up. But researchers who study the importance of breakfast for weight loss don’t necessarily agree. If you’re trying to lose weight, make sure you get your facts straight about breakfast so that you get the weight loss results that you deserve.

GettyImages-143744013-56aa06e45f9b58b7d00084ce

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Importance of Breakfast for Weight Loss.

Do you need to eat breakfast to boost metabolism and lose weight? Not necessarily, say researchers. When it comes to studying breakfast and metabolism, the science is inconclusive. In fact, there’s no research proving that breakfast can boost metabolism.

When members of the American Society for Nutrition met to discuss the importance of breakfast, they looked at studies about meal frequency and weight loss. Their conclusion? Since eating habits are very hard to study, research hasn’t been able to prove that eating breakfast – or any particular meal – can boost metabolism. In fact, they found no data to suggest that how often we eat has any effect on how many calories you burn every day.

A statement released by the International Society for Sports Nutrition reinforced that conclusion. The group said that “Increased meal frequency does not appear to significantly enhance diet-induced thermogenesis, total energy expenditure or resting metabolic rate.” In real terms, that means that eating regular meals does not have a direct effect on the number of calories we burn throughout the day.

 

What Dietitians Say About Eating Breakfast to Boost Metabolism

You might be tempted to dismiss the science because it does seem logical that eating breakfast can boost metabolism. And a healthy breakfast is good for you, right? But even registered dietitians are clear about what breakfast can and cannot do for you if you want to lose weight.

Nutrition and diabetes educator Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D., CDE, explains that many people misunderstand the benefits of eating breakfast.

“Eating breakfast doesn’t affect metabolic rate in the way people like to say it does. There are studies to support breakfast eating for weight management, but not for a calorie-burning boost.”

Her opinion is supported by the position statement of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics which is endorsed by the American College of Sports Medicine. In their statement about eating breakfast, they confirm that, while eating breakfast has been associated with a lower body weight, there is no clear evidence to suggest that eating breakfast can boost metabolism.
Should I Eat Breakfast to Lose Weight?

If you’re a dieter, and you’re confused about how to boost your metabolism to lose weight, don’t worry. The science about breakfast doesn’t mean that you should skip your morning meal. Just because eating breakfast may not improve your metabolism doesn’t mean that you should skip the meal entirely.

There are certainly benefits to eating a healthy breakfast, and to eating regular meals throughout the day.

But it’s important to understand the importance of breakfast if you want to lose weight. Breakfast is no more or less important than any other meal. What matters in the end is your total calorie intake for the day. Eat healthy meals that are low in calories to help you curb hunger and avoid binge eating. Then use exercise and an active lifestyle to boost metabolism and lose weight for good.

Sources:

David J. Clayton, David J. Stensel, Lewis J. James” Effect of breakfast omission on subjective appetite, metabolism, acylated ghrelin and GLP-17-36 during rest and exercise Journal of Nutrition July 11, 2015.

McCrory MA, Campbell WW. ” Effects of eating frequency, snacking, and breakfast skipping on energy regulation: symposium overview.” Journal of Nutrition, January 14, 2011.

American Dietetic Association. ” Position of the American Dietetic Association: Weight Management.” February 2009.

Paul M La Bounty, Bill I Campbell, et al. ” International Society of Sports Nutrition position stand: meal frequency.” Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition March 16, 2011.

 

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FREE Fitness Class: Phight Back!

PHIGHT BACK FLYER

PHIGHT BACK FLYER

Fitness Resources is excited to announce a NEW SELF-DEFENSE workout called PHIGHT BACK!

JOIN US for a free introduction class July 23rd at 10:00 am & 11:00 am. Reserve Your Spot 
TODAY! Call to sign up: 614-286-7883

What is the PHIGHT BACK!?
It’s an energetic fusion of practical self-defense techniques, utilizing a variety of music to control the tempo of aggression.
www.phightback.com

Who’s it for?
The workout is for anyone who refuses to be a victim! The class is open to anyone of any size or shape. Whether you are someone that wants to supplement their workout routine or want to learn practical self-defense techniques, this will be a great workout for you!

What is the workout?
The self-defense techniques will consist of Tae Kwon Do/Muay Thai Kicks, American/Muay Thai Boxing, Silat/Kali knife, stick and self-defense techniques. (Training knives are rubber and sticks have foam padding.)

You will learn the proper technique for elbows, jabs, over-hands, hooks, knees, kicks (front, round-house, side, back). All of which will be done with a partner and individual shadow boxing.

You will also be striking focus pads, air shields as well as light contact to your partner. (This is not a full contact MMA workout.)
Music will be playing in the background to control the tempo of aggression and create a great cardio exercise. (You can hear the PHIGHT BACK! playlist on Spotify. Just follow tfrank-1)

Who’s teaching the workout?
Tim Frank will be teaching the class. He has a black belt in Tae Kwon Do, and has studied a variety of combative styles under Guru Jeff Brown in Dayton, Ohio.

What next?
Join us by checking it out for yourself. Reserve a spot, please email to: mayesm@fitness-resources.com

Call to sign up today: 614-286-7883
Sponsored by: Fitness Resources
DOWNLOAD PHIGHT BACK FLYER »

How To Work Out When You’re In A Crunch

Sometimes we just don’t have the time to make it to the gym. For those days were you need to be from point A to Z and it feels like you don’t have enough hours in the day, your body weight comes in handy. You can use your own body weight to workout anywhere and anytime. No extra trip to the gym, no need to buy weights, it’s all you! Make the time in your day with this easy 15 minute workout. Read more for a full routine that’s as easy as 1-2-3, along with tips and trips to help you along the way to your fitness and health goals!

Let us help you with your goals! Contact us for a personal training session to see how we can personalize your workouts and allow you to get the most out of your fitness regimen!

warmup

1 ) Warm Up

You may only have 15 minutes, but warm ups are extremely important for preparing your muscles and increasing your range of motion, allowing you to get the most out of your exercises.

  1. 90 Seconds: Spider Lunge With Twist + Jumping Jacks
  • Start standing tall, then fold forward.
  • Walk your hands out to a high plank, then bring your right foot and set it on the floor on the outside of your right hand.
  • Reach your right arm to the ceiling and twist your torso to the right. Return your arm back to the ground and step your right foot back so that you’re in high plank. Repeat on the left side.
  • Then walk your hands back to your feet and roll up to stand. Do 10 jumping jacks, and start again from the beginning. Continue for 90 seconds.

2. 45 Seconds: Squat To Front Lunge

  • Start standing with feet hip-distance apart. Shift your weight into your heels and sit back to perform a squat, bending your knees to 90 degrees without letting them go beyond the toes.
  • Push through your heels to return to standing and now take a step forward with your right leg, and bend both knees so that you’re in a lunge position.
  • Step back to standing and repeat, starting with a squat, but now stepping forward with your left leg. Continue alternating for 45 seconds.

3. 45 Seconds: Reverse Lunge To Straight-Leg Front Kick

  • Start standing with feet hip-distance apart. Step your right leg back and lower into a lunge, aiming for a 90-degree bend in both knees.
  • As you return to standing, sweep your right leg forward into a front kick, keeping the leg straight.
  • Repeat on the left side and continue alternating for 45 seconds.

 

Plyometrics-High-Knee-Skips

2) Full-Body Workout

Here is where the workout magic happens! This full-body workout will allow you to work the major muscles in your body while also getting that cardio in.

  1. 30 Seconds: 8 High Knees + 2 Drop Squats
  • Perform eight high knees in place, driving elbows back. (It’s like an exaggerated running in place where you’re trying to lift your knees to your hips.)  
  • Then, jump out into a squat with feet parallel, tapping your right hand on the ground between your feet. Jump back together and repeat, tapping your left hand to floor. Repeat for 30 seconds.

2. 30 Seconds: Break Dancers

  • Start on all fours with your hands and toes on the ground and your feet slightly wider than hip-distance apart.
  • Lift your right hand towards the ceiling and kick your left leg through, twisting your body to face the right.
  • Come back to start and repeat on the opposite side. Continue for 30 seconds.

3. 30 Seconds: Burpee Push-Up Broad Jump

  • Start in a high plank and perform a push-up, bringing your chest as close to the floor as you can.
  • Jump your feet to the outsides of your hands. Start to stand up and instead of jumping up, jump forward (distance is the goal).
  • Now jump up and turn around 180 degrees.
  • Place your hands back on the floor and jump feet back to high plank and start from the beginning. Repeat for 30 seconds.

3) Don’t Forget To Cool Down!

This can be incorporated into whatever you’re doing next, maybe walking to your next destination, stretching while you wait for your shower water to warm up, or even stretching before you go to bed.

 

Lower Back Pain? Try these five stretches to help relieve it!

Pain in the lower back is extremely common, especially when you get older. By building strength in the weak areas of your back and stretching out the tight ones, you can treat and even prevent pain. Please make sure to see your doctor if you already experience back pain to make sure you are cleared to do these exercises.

pelvictiltforweb_7559-56aa41435f9b58b7d003476ePelvic Tilt

This move is great for introducing movement to a stiff spine. Begin by lying on your back. Rock your pelvis forward and backward (as seen in image below), which has the effect of flattening your lower back against the floor. This move can also be done by standing with your back against the wall. Do 10-15 rounds of this stretch.

 

sphinx-56aa419c3df78cf772aedd4cSphinx Pose

The position of this stretch emphasizes the curve of the lower back. Roll over onto your stomach, making sure that your elbows are directly under your shoulders. Press into your forearms to keep your shoulders away from your ears. Keep this stretch 5-10 breaths, rest on your stomach for a few breaths, and repeat if needed.

 

1-catcow-56f94bb35f9b5829866e2c25Cat-Cow Stretch (Chakravakasana)

This is a great stretch to expand the actions of the pelvic tilt into the whole spine – from tailbone to neck. Start on your hands and knees, making sure your wrists are underneath your shoulders and your knees underneath the hips. As you inhale, tilt your pelvis back so that your tail sticks up and take your gaze up gently without cranking your neck. As you exhale, tip your pelvis forward, tucking your tailbone and drop your head. Repeat with each inhale and exhale, and continue for 5-10 breaths.

 

childspose-56722a863df78ccc15ec87a8Child’s Pose (Balasana)

Use this position to take a pause and stretch your entire spine. Start on your knees, keeping them as wide as your mat (or shoulder width apart) with your big toes touching. Bring your belly along with your forehead to the floor, stretching your arms in front of you or back alongside of your thighs. Stay as long as you like, inhaling and exhaling deeply.

 

chairtwist1500-5680b7463df78ccc15a85237Chair Twist

This twist is an excellent way to keep your spine flexible. Start by sitting sideways on your chair, with your right shoulder towards the back of the chair. While holding on to the back of the chair, twist your torso to the right. Lengthen your spine on each inhale and twist on each exhale for five breaths. Repeat on the other side.